Audio Engineering Equipment

You have determined that you are interested in a career in the field of audio engineering. You have decided you want to attend an audio engineering school, you have explored the job possibilities, now what audio engineering equipment would you need to become a success? In this article, we will discuss some of the most important and common audio engineering equipment used by the top engineers today. Mix Engineer

There are a host of different audio engineering equipment that you will likely work with as you delve into the world of audio engineering. You will be responsible for recordings, manipulating, editing, mastering, and mixing of the different sounds using a variety of different equipment both digital and analog. This means you will have to make use of sound recording equipment, sound broadcasting equipment, and sound reinforcement equipment.

Mixing consoles

This audio engineering equipment is also referred to as a soundboard. It is used for mixing and routing audio sounds. This means changing any parts of dynamics, tones, and levels of the audio to produce the sound required. The mixer uses either digital or analog signal, or a combination of both. This depends on what type of mixing console is being used.

Microphones

Microphones are a very important part of audio engineering equipment. They are required to record the sounds of music, voices, movies, and a host of other sounds.

Signal Processors

This is a piece of audio equipment that defines analog signals and allows for analysis. These come in two different types of microprocessors, either general purpose or integrated circuits.

Tape Machines

These are used for recording sounds. The sounds from the microphone are recorded and stored onto the tape machine, which is then used to play back the recorded sounds.

Digital Audio Workstations

Also referred to as DAW, this audio engineering equipment is used for digital audio. It is used for recording, editing, and playing back sounds recorded digitally. It works well for the manipulation of sounds. Typically, digital audio workstations are either integrated within the mixing console or computer based and used with software.